Lumbini-Kapilvastu Day Blog

Welcome to Lumbini, Nepal – the birthplace of Buddha

Posts Tagged ‘Living News’

The 7 Chakras and Their Significance to Your Life

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 16, 2011

By Sadhguru, Founder of Isha Foundation

Chakras are energy centers. Although most people have heard of seven chakras, there are actually 114 in the body. The human body is a complex energy form; in addition to the 114 chakras, it also has 72,000 “nadis,” or energy channels, along which vital energy, or “prana,” moves. When the nadis meet at different points in the body, they form a triangle. We call this triangle a chakra, which means “wheel.” We call it a wheel because it symbolizes growth, dynamism and movement, so even though it is actually a triangle, we call it a chakra. Some of these centers are very powerful, while others are not as powerful. At different levels, these energy centers produce different qualities in a human being.

Fundamentally, any spiritual path can be described as a journey from the base chakra, called the “Mooladhara,” which is located at the base of the spine, to the “Sahasrar,” which located at the top of the head. This journey of movement from the Mooladhara to Sahasrar is from one dimension to another. It may happen in many different ways, and various yogic practices can effect this movement.

Mooladhara is really made up of two terms: “Moola” means the root or source, and “adhar” means the foundation. It is the very basic foundation of life. In the physical body, your energies need to be in the Mooladhara chakra to some extent. Otherwise, you cannot exist. If the Mooladhara chakra alone is dominant, food and sleep will be the predominant factors in your life. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Tango of Ego and Soul

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on February 25, 2011

Dr. Judith Rich, Speaker, trainer, writer, coach, creator of Rx For The Soul: http://www.judithrich.com

Our lives unfold between the shores of the conscious and the unconscious. The conscious mind, when unexamined, reflects the agenda of the Ego, and concerns itself with matters of survival. It experiences and interprets events through the lens of its limiting perceptions; mainly, fear, and attempts to exert its power and influence through the use of the Will, the Ego’s instrument.

When the conscious or objective mind is in service to the Ego it is concerned with appearances, safety, comfort and maintaining the illusion of control. The Ego-driven mind wants to know: “How do I look? What will others think of me? Am I right? Am I loved/ good enough? Am I safe? Am I in control? How can I avoid pain?”

On a distant shore in a faraway land, the unconscious or subjective mind resides. Both personal and impersonal agenda take up residency there. The subjective mind houses our personally repressed memories as well as the transpersonal agenda of the universe. One could say the entire universe is housed within each one of us and it is only a dream, insight, reflection or imagination away! Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Do Positive People Live Longer?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 4, 2010

Huffington Post By David Hamilton, Ph.D.*

Most people assume that positive thinking is just something that we do to help achieve our goals, or even to get through difficult times. But a host of exciting research has shown that attitude affects our health — so much so, in fact, that a positive attitude can add years to our lives.

Take the following study performed at Carnegie Mellon University, for instance. In the study, each of 193 healthy volunteers between the ages of 18 and 55 was given nasal drops containing a cold or flu virus.

Participants were also assessed for their emotional style — whether they tended to experience positive emotions, like happiness, liveliness and calmness, or whether they tended to experience negative emotions, like anxiousness, hostility, and depressive tendencies. Each person’s health was then monitored in quarantine. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How the Common Good Is Transforming Our World

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 18, 2010

Huffington Post By Douglas LaBier, Ph.D. *

In my previous post I wrote about a rising social psychosis that’s visible in three areas of our society. It’s likely to prevail for some time, but I think it’s like a wave that’s crested and will crash to the shore. The reason is that the social psychosis is a backlash against a steadily growing consciousness and behavior that refocuses personal lives and public policies towards promoting the common good.

By the “common good” I’m referring to a broad evolution beyond values and actions that serve narrow self-interest, and towards those guided by inclusiveness — supporting well-being, economic success, security, human rights and stewardship of resources for the benefit of all, rather than just for some. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How Meditation Affects the Gray Matter of the Brain

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on October 8, 2010

Huffington Post By David Hamilton*, Ph.D. (PhD in organic chemistry)

I like to meditate. It makes me feel at ease and I am convinced that the sense of calm it produces helps me to handle thedaily challenges of my life. There are, of course, times when I don’t keep up my daily practice of sitting quietly for 10 or 15 minutes, but these are the times in my life when I experience more stress.

Stress affects everyone. I don’t know a single person who doesn’t get stressed. But unfortunately, it plays a major role in illness. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in fact, up to 90 percent of doctor visits in the U.S. may be stress related. Meditation is an antidote to stress, just as an aspirin can counter a headache. A regular practice can be a major boost to health. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Fire up Those Neurons for Positive Thinking

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 27, 2010

Huffington Post

Rick Hanson, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist

Scientists believe that your brain has a built in “negativity bias.” In other words, as we evolved over millions of years, dodging sticks and chasing carrots, it was a lot more important to notice, react to and remember sticks than it was for carrots.

That’s because — in the tough environments in which our ancestors lived — if they missed out on a carrot, they usually had a shot at another one later on. But if they failed to avoid a stick — a predator, a natural hazard or aggression from others of their species — Wham, no more chances to pass on their genes.

The negativity bias shows up in lots of ways. For example, studies have found that:

  • In a relationship, it typically takes five good interactions to make up for a single bad one.
  • People will work much harder to avoid losing100 than they will work to gain the same amount of money.
  • Painful experiences are much more memorable than pleasurable ones.

In your own mind, what do you usually think about at the end of the day? The 50 things that went right, or the one that went wrong? Like the guy who cut you off in traffic, what you wish you had said differently to a coworker, or the one thing on your To Do list that didn’t get done … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

This Is Your Brain On Meditation: Mingyur Rinpoche Describes The Science Of Happiness

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 29, 2010

Huffington Post

A hush fell over the room as Youngey Mingyur Rinpoche took the stage to begin his teaching. Rinpoche, the revered Tibetan Buddhist lama, teacher, and so-called “happiest man in the world” was commencing an Introduction to Awareness Meditation event, hosted by the New York Open Center. Nearly every seat in the large auditorium was occupied.

“How many of you have learned meditation before?” he asked the crowd, solemnly. Many of the audience members raised their hands. “Oh, great. Then I don’t have to teach you!” he quipped, tilting his head back to chuckle. Though Rinpoche’s joking demeanor makes him a popular teacher, he is serious when it comes to meditation practices.

Rinpoche’s teaching is informed by contemporary scientific research. He considers himself to be, as he put it, “a short red guinea pig” — a test subject for some of the most cutting edge neurological theories, and a firm supporter of the ongoing dialogue between science and Buddhism. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

How to be Desciplined

Posted by Sanu Ghimire on June 24, 2010

Huffington Post

By Susan Piver[1]

There are some things I’m good at, if I do say so myself. I know about generosity. I know from patience. I know how to try really, really hard. I’m devoted to the search for wisdom. However there is one skill that I truly suck at and, without it, all these other good qualities are considerably weaker than they could be. That skill?

Discipline.

Readers of my blog may be aware of an experiment I conducted about a year or so ago called “The Great Discipline Experiment” or GDE, in which I took all the things I KNOW I want to (and should) do — meditate, journal, write, exercise, drink a lot of water, answer all my emails, eat healthy, take vitamins, spend time focused on those I love — and tried to do them. Every day. Period. For a month. I had become sick of being all “I need to take better care of myself” and “I must write Every Single Day” and “Susan, you are WASTING YOUR LIFE. Get with it.” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Love, Spirituality and Four Noble Truths

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 21, 2010

Huffington Post

By Susan Piver[1]

I have been a student of Buddhism since 1995, and the study and practice of dharma inform my actions, friendships and creative focus. When you become a Buddhist, part of the commitment is to take off the training wheels and do your best to put the dharma into play in all situations. It’s no longer theoretical. It is your life. It’s a fun, scary, and noble challenge.

When the Buddha became enlightened, the first thing he handed out was the four noble truths and upon becoming a Buddhist, they are your benchmarks.

  1. Life is suffering. (Doesn’t mean “life sucks,” by the way. More like, “life changes.”)
  2. Suffering is caused by attachment. (Wanting things to be other than they are.)
  3. It is possible to stop suffering. (Phew.)
  4. There is an eight-fold path to liberate yourself from suffering, which includes such things as Right Speech, Right Action and so on. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Article | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,069 other followers

%d bloggers like this: