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Posts Tagged ‘Buddhist’

Lord Buddha’s Birth Place is Nepal

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on September 18, 2013

By Dirgha Raj Prasai

Buddha born in NepalDirgha Raj PrasaiThe Indian Zee TV is going to exercise that releasing the fake news- Lord Buddha’s birth place was India. But, it is 100% fallacious and wrong. Nepal is the birth land of Lord Buddha. This fake propaganda of Zee TV will invite confrontation between Nepal and India. Gautam Buddha was born in Lumbini in the 6th century BC in mid Tarai, Nepal.. Lord Buddha is the asset of Nepal who was born in this pious land. A scholar Ram Kumar Shrestha writes- ‘Ashoka Pillar built in 300 BC by Indian Emperor Ashok during his pilgrimage to the birthplace of Buddha still stands Lumbini. A thorough excavation and investigation near the Ashok Pillar has found the Nativity Stone that was laid down to mark
the Buddha’s birthplace.

An international team of archaeologists has begun a three-year survey, coordinated by the UNESCO of the archaeological ruins of Lumbini, the birthplace of Buddha in Nepal. The team of archaeologists, including experts from Nepal’s Department of Archaeology and the Lumbini Development Trust, is directed by Robin Coningham, UNESCO Archaeological Expert and Professor of Archaeology, University of Durham. The UNESCO, after careful examination all facts and evidences, has already recognized Lumbini as the Buddha’s birthplace and a World Heritage Site’.

The descriptions of famous ancient Chinese pilgrims, Huian Tsang (who traveled through India between AD 629 & 645) and Fa Hein (who traveled between AD 400 & AD 414) indicate to this area, saying, ‘Lumbini, where the Lord was born, is a piece of heaven on earth where one could see the snowy mountains amidst a splendid garden embedded with Stupas and monasteries.’ Read the rest of this entry »

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Buddha Birth Place Correction in Nan Tien Temple

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 31, 2013

[As we heard about Budhha birth place misinformation in the biggest Buddhist temple – Nan Tian Temple, last year we decided manoj-pantato try our best to correct the misinformation there. I requested Consulate General, NSW HE Deepak Khadka to write a letter to the temple to create favourable environment to our team to have authority to take video inside the temple, however; the team found that the misinformation was already corrected. We were happy but also surprised. When I met Mr. Manoj Pant he shared his story and I asked to write at least few paragraphs. On behalf of Lumbini-Kapilvastu Day Movement, I would like to thank Mr. Pant for the information and this small article.]

By Manoj Panta

Nan Tien Temple known as “Southern Paradise” is the largest Buddhist temple in the Southern Hemisphere. It is situated at Berkeley – a suburb of Wollongong in the state of New South Wales. It is one of the branch temples of Fo Guang Shan, founded in 1965 by Venerable Master Hsing Yun, which has over 200 branches worldwide. Since the opening of the temple in October 1995, it has become a new venue not only for local but also for international tourists and also acts as an important cultural centre bridging different cultures.

Nan Tian Temple

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Jennifer Lopez Turns Buddhist.

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 31, 2013

jennifer-lopezLondon, Oct 9, 2004 — Celebrities seem to have a strange fascination for Buddhism, and this time it is Latino diva jennifer Lopez who is taking up Buddhism.

The ‘Wedding Planner’ actress was reportedly so impressed by her co-star Richard Gere’s dedication to Buddhism that she was inspired to embrace the religion after she had a number of spiritual talks with him, reports the Sun.

Lopez, who is acting with Gere in the movies ‘Shall we Dance’ says that she is now aware of higher energy, and the fact that it is very important to be a good human being.

“Now I know there’s a force in the world. There’s an energy that if you put out good and you put out love it comes back to you. That’s a basic thing that works for me,” the report quoted her as saying.

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How’s Buddhism spreading in Africa?

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 15, 2013

By Rev. ILukpitiye Pannasekara Nayaka Thero

Buddhism came to other countries few years ago by different Buddhist teachers from different countries. They have established it properly and continue up to now.

But, very recently it came to Africa not more than 100 years history of Buddhism. It is very new, but, many countries like as Tanzania, Botswana, Kenya, Uganda, Malawi and South Africa have many Buddhist temples, organizations, centers and academic studies. Therefore after looking way back we can have some happy progress in future.

Among those countries Tanzania, Botswana, Kenya, Uganda and Malawi have one Buddhist temple in each country.
But, South Africa is having more Buddhist centers, temples and organizations which teach different kinds of Buddhist practices.

Especially University of South Africa (UNISA) (www.unisa.ac.za) is having some Buddhist studies up to Doctorate Degree studies under the religious studies. And also at University of Botswana (www.ub.bw) teach distance and internal Buddhist studies. Therefore it is better to open our Buddhist view about Buddhism in Africa. Read the rest of this entry »

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HUYEN SANG’S TRAVEL TO LUMBINI: A DESCRIPTION

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on June 1, 2013

greater-lumbini

To the north-east of the arrow well about 80-90 li, we came to Lumbini (Lavani) garden.  Here is the bathing tank of the Sakyas, the water of which is bright and clear as a mirror, and the surface covered with a mixture of flowers.

To the north of this 24 or 25 paces there is an Asoka-flower tree, which is now decayed: this is the place where Bodhisattva was born on the eighth day of the second half of the same month, corresponding to the fifteenth day of the third month with us.  East from this is a stupa built by Asoka-raja, on the spot where the two dragons bathed the body of the prince.  When Bodhisattva was born, he walked without assistance in the direction of the four quarters, seven paces in each direction, and said, “I am the only lord in heaven and earth; from this time forth my births are finished.“  Where his feet had trod there sprang up great lotus flowers.  Moreover, two dragons sprang forth, and, fixed in the air, poured down the one a cold and the other a warm water stream from his mouth, to wash the prince.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Buddha Day: Let’s Go Federation Square

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on May 16, 2013

weblogo500x500

Buddha’s Day and Multicultural Festival is a truly unique annual event which celebrates Melbourne’s diverse multicultural society. Running over two days (on 18th and 19th of this month), the Buddha’s Day and Multicultural Festival begins in the heart of Melbourne, at Federation Square. Let’s show our solidarity to this Grand Program on 19/05/2013 as we are from the country where Buddha was born. Read the rest of this entry »

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Bill Clinton Turns To The Art Of Buddhist Meditation

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 22, 2013

clintonFormer American president Bill Clinton has taken his exercise regime to spiritual heights – by learning the art of Buddhist meditation to help him relax.

The politician, 65, has recently taken up a healthier life-style including becoming vegan after a string of heart problems over the years.

And in his latest bid to improve his well-being, the Democrat has hired his own personal Buddhist monk to help him learn how to meditate properly.

Radaronline quoted a source as saying: ‘Ever since his heart scare, Bill has looked for ways to help him relax.

‘He has a hectic life, he travels a lot on business as an ambassador for the U.S. and needs something to keep him sane.

‘Meditation offers him that, he has a mantra that he likes to chant and after every session he feels transformed and full of positive energy.

‘It’s definitely doing him the world of good – he feels fitter and stronger than ever.’

In February 2004, Clinton was rushed to Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City after complaining of chest pains.

He needed to have two coronary stents implanted in his heart and a few months later in September underwent quadruple bypass surgery. Read the rest of this entry »

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Greater Lumbini Master Plan: A Herculean Task Ahead

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 6, 2012

DR. JIBA RAJ POKHAREL

Dahal has a tall hill to climb‚ as the Greater Lumbini Project will be almost ten times costly than Lumbini alone. It is a Herculean task indeed. The need of revisiting the present rather ambitious Lumbini plan without diluting its sanctity and concepts has already been expressed in different quarters

Lumbini is again in the news, after remaining in the sidelines for a long time, following the formation of a high level committee chaired by the former prime minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal. And, why shouldn’t it be when it is the birthplace of Buddha? Buddha’s notion that there is suffering in the world with desire as its cause has touched the heart and mind of innumerable people around the globe. It is unfortunate that Lumbini should face developmental constraints due to shortage of funds.
This is, however, not the first time that Lumbini has been virtually raised from the ashes in its three thousand year history. It came into prominence in 563 BC when Buddha was born. Lumbini was in the limelight during the visit of Emperor Ashoka, who erected the Lumbini pillar bearing an inscription of the birth of Buddha in 249 BC. Lumbini appears to have started to fall into oblivion as none of the visiting Chinese travelers Mr Yuch Chih in the fourth century, Mr. Fa Hsien in the fifth century and Mr. Yuan Chwang in the seventh make a mention of the all important Lumbini pillar inscription, implying that it was buried in the earth, and nobody bothered to maintain it which reflects serious neglect. It is reiterated by the observation of the horse capital of Lumbini pillar lying on the ground by Mr. Wang Hiuen Tse remaining unattended again in the seventh century. Lumbini was still well known as a Buddist religious site till the visit of Ripu Malla in the year 1312, which is evident from the inclusion of a popular Buddhist verse om mani padmeham in his inscription. But, after that the popularity of Lumbini seems to have taken a nose dive, as Khadga Shamsher had to clear several feet of earth around the Lumbini pillar, when he visited it in the year 1896 along with Mr. Fuhrer. It was given a new lease of life by Kaisher Shamsher in 1928, when he did some construction work. The visit of U Thant, the United Nations General Secretary in the 1950s, was instrumental for the present revival of Lumbini. He mobilized the international community leading to the formation of an International Committee for the development of Lumbini under the umbrella of the United Nations. This international move triggered the inception of Lumbini Development Committee in an effort to coordinate works at the national level.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Buddha Birthplace Issue: Bishal Kafle wrote to Professor Charles W. Hill

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 1, 2012

Update: Response fro Professor
On Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 12:16 PM, Charles W.L. Hill <chill@u.washington.edu> wrote:

Thanks Brishal, that error was corrected several editions ago (we are now on the ninth edition).

Regards

Charles Hill

Buddhists and researchers want to visit the proper birthplace of Buddha – Lumbini, Nepal – and not the fake one, however; there are lots of misinformation – in course books, web sites etc. The misinformation is due to two reasons: intentionally and unknowingly due to the misinformation created. Lumbini, Nepal is under UNESCO world heritage site list and UNESCO this decision was because of Buddha’s birthplace. Please click here for the detail.

To try to dismiss this misinformation is everybody’s duty as every year thousands of tourists are taking to the fake Lumbini and they do not know that they visited fake Lumbini.  Their intention is to see the real one and not the fake one. We, therefore, can imagine how they feel if they know the reality. This is against human rights.

Charles W. Hill, Professor at University of Washington wrote a book “International Business-Competing in the Global Market Place” and in this book also misinformation on Buddha’s birthplace. Bishal Kafle wrote a letter requesting to correct the information and we would like to post his letter here for the information: Read the rest of this entry »

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Buddha’s Teaching Can Help Global Peace – UN Sec Gen

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on March 10, 2012

[As UN Secretary General is visiting Nepal, we would like to post these old relevant news for your kind information]

Buddha’s Teaching Can Help Global Peace – UN Sec Gen

Narinjara News, May 8, 2009
United Nations, New York — UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said in his message delivered to the world communities on Wednesday that the Buddha’s teaching could help the world become peaceful.

“All of us can learn from the Buddha’s spirit of compassion. His timeless teachings can help us to navigate the many global problems we face today,” said Ban Ki-moon in his message.

His message came ahead of the Buddha’s birthday, traditionally known as Vesak or Visakah, a full-moon which this year fell on 9 May, 2009.

Vesak is the name of the month of the Buddha’s birth in the Indian lunar calendar. Buddhist communities around the world celebrate the full-moon day with great reverence and piety as the day synchronized the birth, enlightenment, and passing of the Buddha.

“The need for global solidarity may seem like a modern concept, but it is not. More than 2,500 years ago, the Buddha taught that nothing exists in isolation, and that all phenomena are interdependent. Just as profoundly, he taught that we cannot be happy as long as others suffer, and that when we do reach out, we discover the best in ourselves,” he added.

He also urged every individual to resolve to help people who are suffering, in order to secure a better future for all, in his message marking Vesak.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Lumbini, Nepal – the Birth Place of the Buddha

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on November 11, 2011

Lumbinī (Sanskrit: लुम्बिनी, “the lovely”) is a Buddhist pilgrimage site in the Rupandehi district of Nepal. It is the place where Queen Mayadevi gave birth to Siddhartha Gautama, who as the Buddha Gautama founded the Buddhist tradition. The Buddha lived between roughly 563 and 483 BCE. Lumbini is one of four magnets for pilgrimage that sprang up in places pivotal to the life of the Buddha.

Lumbini is in Nepal. It is geographically located 25 km east of the municipality of Kapilavastu, Nepal; where the Buddha lived till the age of 29. Lumbini has a number of temples, including the Mayadevi temple, and others under construction. Also here is the Puskarini or Holy Pond – where the Buddha’s mother took the ritual dip prior to his birth and where he, too, had his first bath – as well as the remains of Kapilvastu palace. At other sites near Lumbini, earlier Buddhas were, according to tradition, born, achieved ultimate awakening and finally relinquished earthly form. Read the rest of this entry »

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The place where Buddha attained face

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on August 7, 2011

As you know, every big mountain, being literally the navel of the Earth, eventually accumulates a lot of myths and legends, and becomes the axis of the foundation and the fantastic, yet very real stories. The perturbation vertical space bizarre twists of fate and age. For myths and legends of the local population is responsible, the heroes byley – different kinds of adventurers, mountaineers and other violent “surfers”.

It would be interesting to make something like a historical chronicle, for example, for each eight-, but it does take a lot for them to wander:) On Everest, I’ve tried to write , now part of Nanga Parbat, the more that this mountain will give good odds that the same Everest , and Kashmir – the place is not easy.

1. Nanga Parbat. Painting by Nicholas Roerich

Brief introduction: Nanga Parbat – the first ever eight-to which people have tried to ascend, the first-ever eight-, conquered by man alone. Prior to Everest climbing became popular in the environment, Nanga Parbat kept the championship in the number of dead climbers.

This mountain has witnessed the birth and development of Buddhism in the region, not far from it came the first image of the Buddha. Her foot was held Alexander of Macedon, the Muslim conquerors (ie, Tamerlane and his descendant Babur founded the Mughal dynasty), Sikh invaders. Nanga Parbat knows first hand what a big game of British and Russian empires. Roerich painted the mountain. In the end, this mountain long before the whole of Europe saw the swastika neinduistskuyu – at the top in the early 1930s, tried to climb the Nazis.

***

Once part of Afghanistan, part of the Pamirs, the whole of northern Pakistani-administered Kashmir and Ladakh were Buddhist. About Ladakh is known to many, but here’s what Baltistan (Gilgit Baltistan, now known as the northern part of Kashmir) had a different name – Tibet-i-Khurd, little is known. Translates it as a Small Tibet, the vast majority of people here and now speaks the language of the Baltic States – one of the western dialect of Tibetan language, but it is Muslim.

A little farther west, in the valleys of Dir and Swat in the XX century, excavated six years of Buddhist temples and villages of the world’s greatest Tibetologist Giuseppe Tucci (incidentally, the teacher Michelle Pesselya, which show the way to go in Pesselya forbidden kingdom Mustang). Tucci found in Swat as many Buddhist antiquities, that the excavation could not stop until now.

However, once from 2007 to 2009 he held down the valley of the Taliban, a Buddhist heritage was dealt a severe blow. The Taliban began destroying bodrenko “idols”, as in his time destroyed Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan. This is despite the fact that none of the Muslim invaders of the early period up to Tamerlane’s finger to these monuments were not touched. Yes, and “idols” are in fact older than Islam in a couple of hundred years.

In 326 BC through the Khyber Pass connecting Afghanistan with Pakistan today, in the kingdom of Gandhara Alexander of Macedon invaded. He went with his army across Kashmir, crossed the Indus and Jhelum and even went to the Ganges.

2. Jhelum River (also known as Gidaspov). Here Macedonian army defeated the Indians along the river lay our way to Nanga Parbat

Read the rest of this entry »

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The Buddha As Icon

Posted by Ram Kumar Shrestha on April 6, 2011

By Michael Brenner, Senior Fellow, the Center for Transatlantic Relations; Professor of International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh

This is the season when religious symbolism is prominent — especially in the Christian world. We tend to assume that similar symbols figure in the same manner in other religions. That is not so. Buddhism is the notable example of why.

The Buddha image is the most exceptional of religious icons. Its aesthetic is unique. Sculptures, paintings and photos have made it as familiar as portraits of Jesus on the cross. Ubiquity, though, has voided it of mystery and meaning. For stylistic simplicity makes it all too easy to miss the refinements of expression that convey the essence of Buddhist cosmology. The observer thereby fails to grasp its value as an aid to meditation as well.

In the first centuries after Siddhartha’s death, the emergent spiritual movement that was early Buddhism created no images of their guide. That was not due to any prohibition on physical representations such as that laid down in Islam against depictions of Allah or Mohammed. Rather, it reflected two cardinal features of Siddhartha and the religion that he inspired. Paramount is the central fact that he was not a prophet, did not see himself as a prophet and was not viewed as a prophet by his disciples. Comparisons with the prophetic religions of Christianity, Islam and Judaism are quite beside the point. The Buddha did not claim to be a messenger for an anthropomorphic god or have special access to any sort of Supreme Being. Indeed, unlike the Hindu sages of his times he never affirmed the existence of a universal spirit or immanent consciousness. In other words, his perspective deviates from the core Vedic concepts of the individual atman as an emanation of the universal brahman. That distinction was the theological difference that has separated the two great Indian religions. Read the rest of this entry »

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